Photos by Elizabeth Keane, Features Writer 

Story by Maya Kusalovic, Staff Writer

Batman and Superman put aside their differences for one night as they wiggled their arms in the air during very competitive game of freeze dance. The tiny tots of Mount Prospect and other nearby villages joined together at Prospect High School for an early Halloween at Haunted High School. Going from classroom to classroom with little plastic pumpkin buckets filled the toddlers with an ecstatic energy as they giggled, marveled, and cried (in that order).

Prospect students themselves provided the backbone for the event, as they passed out candy and chaperoned freeze dance competitions.

Sophomores Alina Paul and Olivia Sibu stood outside their room and greeted young trick or treaters between giggles. Fake cobwebs and blue streamers wrap around Paul like a blanket in a discombobulated manner. This doesn’t seem to bother her, in fact, it attracts attention from some bubbly trick or treaters. A cheerful Paul compliments a small boy’s costume and his “eyes light up”.

Besides the students and kids, parents also go room to room, aiding their child in his or her pursuit of candy.

“It’s just a really festive and kid oriented environment ,” mMother, Sarah Weale, sSaid as her son eagerly waited in line for a Halloween themed stamp.

The normal educational theme of Prospect is completely disregarded, no one can take themselves too seriously. On the other side of the building, active student council member Nicole Park admires the scene.

“[Haunted High School] brings us together as a community and kind of a show little kids what our high school’s about,” Park sSaid.

Park finds that the food drive behind Haunted High School is the main message for the event. Visitors come in and instead of paying with cash, they bring a donation of food cans which are collected in sizable boxes at the front.

“It [Haunted High School] shows how we interact with our community.” Park Said. “That’s expressed through our food drive, all our free activities for kids, and our welcoming personalities.”