By Brendan Burke, Copy Editor

This past week, President Donald Trump has been under fire after stating that he had a phone call with the president of Ukraine on the grounds of getting information about former Vice President Joe Biden, one of Trump’s possible campaign rivals in the upcoming 2020 election. Because of this unlawful action, Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi officially announced that they will be launching an impeachment inquiry against Trump.

Pelosi for months has been a firm advocate for pushing off impeachment proceedings but has just recently turned over a new leaf after the release of the information about the phone call with Ukraine. This has been seen as Trump’s tipping point amongst politicians and is now going to be keenly debated throughout Congress and could end up leading to the removal of Trump from office.

However, this notion is highly unlikely because the Constitution forces a two-thirds majority vote from the Senate in order to remove him from office because the Senate holds the impeachment trial and is seen as the jury. 

As a matter of fact, the entire process will begin with the six committees in the House investigating Trump and his past further before they bring forward an impeachment resolution. Once this occurs, the entire House of Representatives would vote on the resolution to see if the majority would impeach Trump. If they do agree on the resolution, the case gets handed over to the Senate to hold the trial.

Only two presidents, Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, have been impeached by the House of Representatives but were both acquitted by the Senate in their cases. This means that they were impeached, but never removed from office. Many political experts are inferring the same outcome for Trump.

“The actions of the Trump presidency revealed the dishonorable fact of the president’s betrayal of his oath of office, betrayal of our national security and betrayal of integrity of our elections,” Pelosi said in a press conference.